Powered with optional 480 hp Volvo Penta IPS650 diesels, the Solaris Power 48 Open hit a top average speed of 32.2 knots.

Powered with optional 480 hp Volvo Penta IPS650 diesels, the Solaris Power 48 Open hit a top average speed of 32.2 knots. (Courtesy Solaris Power/)Too many times, I’ve seen a boat try to be everything to everyone, and it doesn’t stand out in any particular way. The Solaris Power 48 Open is different. It knows its own identity. The yacht does day cruising and weekending splendidly. It’s also an eye-catcher with modern lobster-boat styling.

Solaris is synonymous with sailing yachts from 40 to 110 feet length overall that usually are found in the Northern European cruising grounds. Since 1974, the brand has focused on quality, seaworthiness and elegance. In 2008, Solaris started a production unit manufacturing motoryachts for other brands. Ultimately, this move created the opportunity to launch a line under the Solaris Power name. Solaris worked with yachtsman and boatbuilder Norberto Ferretti and the team at Victory Design in Italy to create the Solaris Power line.

The Solaris Power 48 Open is the builder’s first step into the power market. Based on what I saw during my day on board, it’s a step in the right direction.

For starters, the Solaris Power 48 Open’s plumb bow delivers a sharp, wave-piercing entry. It flattens to a snub nose at the peak that houses the polished stainless-steel anchor and stylish kickplate. Six feet of freeboard from the waterline and some gently turned flare help create a high-and-dry ride.

The yacht’s high design allows for 6-foot, 6-inch headroom in the forward master stateroom, keeps the hullside windows well above the waterline, and provides safe transit between the forward and aft decks. The metallic aquamarine paint is dazzling in daylight and glows at night, while a retro-style, wraparound windscreen with a single glass pane provides clear sightlines and a hot-rod appearance. The polished tubular frame is super-sturdy, one of many indications of the 48′s considerable craftsmanship.

After cruising, owners and guests can catch rays on the sun pad. Foldout sides increase cockpit real estate.

After cruising, owners and guests can catch rays on the sun pad. Foldout sides increase cockpit real estate. (Courtesy Solaris Power/)The single-mast hardtop support has a robust build. It extends forward over the three helm seats and aft over a console with flip-up countertops that hide a two-burner cooktop, double stainless-steel sinks and a trash receptacle. The cabinets in this console house twin Vitrifrigo fridge drawers, and there’s stowage for dish-and-glass service for six.

The hardtop can support antennas and a radar. It’s rock-steady, not even budging when I gave it a few whacks. Install some tracks if side curtains around the helm are desired.

Aft on the main deck, guests can relax on the two facing bench seats with a center foldout teak table. Or, flip the backrest on the forward seat to allow guests to face forward. Abaft that space is a sun pad, perfect for tanning or watching swimmers in the water.

Fold-down bulwarks to port and starboard add deck real estate. These 9-foot-long, 4-foot-wide balconies add up to 20 percent more room and can be utilized with dock steps for boarding. Built rigidly into the hull, they didn’t creak under the load and felt solid underfoot. Stanchions and ropes can be added for safety.

Full walk-around access can take guests to the forward sun pad or aft to the swim platform. A hydraulic gangway for dock access doubles as a staircase swim ladder when lowered into the water.

A low-profile, single-pane windshield enhances the yacht’s lines while offering protection from wind and spray.

A low-profile, single-pane windshield enhances the yacht’s lines while offering protection from wind and spray. (Courtesy Solaris Power/)Belowdecks, the Solaris Power 48 Open is finished in oak or optional walnut, with light vinyl panels and fabrics that create a bright, airy environment. The master stateroom is in the forepeak with a centerline queen berth, twin lockers, windows and portholes. The en suite head has a glass-basin sink, an enclosed shower stall with a seat, and an electric toilet.

There are options for the lower accommodations. With the one-stateroom, one-head layout, there’s a lounge at the foot of the stairs. A plush, L-shaped sofa converts to a berth for guests, and a fridge and coffee maker can be installed. Or opt for a second stateroom with split berths, a table, a locker and an en suite head with a shower stall. This head doubles as the day head, leaving the master head private. There is space for a crew cabin, or it can be left open for gear and stowage.

Solaris says its plans are to add more powerboats in the 44- to 70-foot range, including Open, Lobster and Flybridge models. Based on what the builder achieved with the Power 48 Open, I can’t wait to see them.

Command and Control

The Solaris Power 48 Open’s helm is just to port of center and is streamlined to ensure 360-degree visibility. With room for two multifunction displays and backlit push-button controls on the console, the dash houses a VHF radio, Volvo Penta throttle controls and a joystick, as well as other systems. There’s also an adjustable helm seat and integrated footrest.

By the Numbers

Optional twin 480 hp Volvo Penta D6 IPS650 engines get the 37,000-pound vessel up and moving. I had a spirited ride at wide-open throttle, averaging 32.2 knots with a fuel burn of 49 gallons perhour for a range of 260 nautical miles. Pulling back to the sweet spot at 2,400 rpm, the 48 Open logged 16.5 knots, 17 gph and a 384 nm range. At 7.1 knots, the diesels sipped 3.2 gph for an 879 nm range.

Take the next step: solarispower.com